You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine by Alexandra Kleeman

51vi7bdlopl-_sx328_bo1204203200_★★★★☆ (4/5) – You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine by Alexandra Kleeman is an insane story that is beyond a brief description.

Grab a bushel of oranges, put on a white sheet, and enjoy the ride ’cause you ain’t getting those Kandy Kakes until you join the cult of Conjoined Eaters.

A very original and disturbing read.

From Amazon:  An intelligent and madly entertaining debut novel reminiscent of The Crying of Lot 49, White Noise, and City of Glass that is at once a missing-person mystery, an exorcism of modern culture, and a wholly singular vision of contemporary womanhood from a terrifying and often funny voice of a new generation.

A woman known only by the letter A lives in an unnamed American city with her roommate, B, and boyfriend, C, who wants her to join him on a reality show called That’s My Partner! A eats (or doesn’t) the right things, watches endless amounts of television, often just for the commercials—particularly the recurring cartoon escapades of Kandy Kat, the mascot for an entirely chemical dessert—and models herself on a standard of beauty that only exists in such advertising. She fixates on the fifteen minutes of fame a news-celebrity named Michael has earned after buying up his local Wally Supermarket’s entire, and increasingly ample, supply of veal.

Meanwhile B is attempting to make herself a twin of A, who hungers for something to give meaning to her life, something aside from C’s pornography addiction, and becomes indoctrinated by a new religion spread throughout a web of corporate franchises, which moves her closer to the decoys that populate her television world, but no closer to her true nature.

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Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld

41uj-zvlg4l-_sx326_bo1204203200_★★★☆☆ (3/5) – Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld is a modern retelling of Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice.  The author does a decent job of trying to take Austen’s original characters and recreate them in modern Cincinnati.  The story is amusing, but it lacks the romance, suspense, and heart of the original tale.

From Amazon:  This version of the Bennet family—and Mr. Darcy—is one that you have and haven’t met before: Liz is a magazine writer in her late thirties who, like her yoga instructor older sister, Jane, lives in New York City. When their father has a health scare, they return to their childhood home in Cincinnati to help—and discover that the sprawling Tudor they grew up in is crumbling and the family is in disarray.

Youngest sisters Kitty and Lydia are too busy with their CrossFit workouts and Paleo diets to get jobs. Mary, the middle sister, is earning her third online master’s degree and barely leaves her room, except for those mysterious Tuesday-night outings she won’t discuss. And Mrs. Bennet has one thing on her mind: how to marry off her daughters, especially as Jane’s fortieth birthday fast approaches.

Enter Chip Bingley, a handsome new-in-town doctor who recently appeared on the juggernaut reality TV dating show Eligible. At a Fourth of July barbecue, Chip takes an immediate interest in Jane, but Chip’s friend neurosurgeon Fitzwilliam Darcy reveals himself to Liz to be much less charming. . . .

And yet, first impressions can be deceiving.

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

51ijpxda3wl-_sx333_bo1204203200_★★★★☆ (4/5) – The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin is a really lovely, sad story. This tale will tug at your heartstrings and likely make you cry. Not perfect, but close….

From Amazon: A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. He lives alone, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. But when a mysterious package appears at the bookstore, its unexpected arrival gives Fikry the chance to make his life over–and see everything anew.

“This novel has humor, romance, a touch of suspense, but most of all love–love of books and bookish people and, really, all of humanity in its imperfect glory.” —Eowyn Ivey, author of The Snow Child

“Marvelously optimistic about the future of books and bookstores and the people who love both.” —The Washington Post